Racism in the Media

Darlene: An article with CNN discusses how Justin Beiber was arrested in Miami for speeding in a residential neighborhood. When Beiber was pulled over he said to the police “What the f*** did I do? Why did you stop me?”  When Beiber was arrested police also found marijuana, alcohol, and other drugs in his system. Beiber then topped it all off by smiling in his mug shot, and all the media had to say about him was that he was a misguided youth.

beiberOn the other hand foot ball player Richard Sherman got excited on the football field and lost his temper and was immediately called a thug. Sherman is a Graduate from Stanford University and while in high school he played football, ran track, and maintained a 4.2 GPA while doing it all. These do not seem to be traits of a thug and yet this is the stereotype he was given.

Jerome: Yes, these stereotypes are being thrown out to anyone and everyone in recent years and no one really seems to think any worse of it.  These stereotypes can easily be described as racism which means that racism is prominent within our society’s as well.  Stereotyping is just another way for groups to use racism but not in an upfront manner for example this happens on twitter all the time.  There is even a twitter account made for generalizing white people and all the actions they do and being a white male I find this offensive.

When you think racism you may think a white male hating on any other race that is different from himself.  Unfortunately this is not the case in recent events; there has been a surge of racism directed towards white Americans that has seemed to go unnoticed.  This is an abnormal type of racism that not many catch onto its a sort of reverse racism.  It is described in Dr. Mendoza-Denton’s article in which white people always under pressure not to be racist that is mentally and socially stressful on them even more so to an extent that a racial slur is to a black man, especially one that is overused and overlooked as a slur unless someone besides their race says it.

Darlene: As an African American female I have noticed racism towards Caucasian Americans has always been apparent, especially in the African American community. With mass media and everything being at the palm of our hands it just seems that people feel untouchable so they feel more comfortable to speak on issues even if it is in ignorance. I do, however, feel that racism in the African American community differs from the Caucasian community simply because of the fact that Caucasians have always been the dominate race and controlled African Americans at one point in time, and in some ways continue to. This idea is expressed more in the video of Leo Muhammad talking to an elderly Caucasian man. He completely admits that many African Americans are racist towards Caucasian Americans, but his explanation goes into detail as to why this is in an extremely educated manner.

Jerome: After watching Leo Muhammad and understanding all he was talking about I would have to strongly agree with actions and his overall education. I also agree with the statement that media has made us ignorant to statements we make about other races and maybe even our own races.  Going back to the education factor that was mentioned in Leo Muhammad, I believe education and ignorance go hand in hand.  Being a young white middle-class male I thought it was impossible to find scholarships and it almost seemed unfair that many of my African American counterparts were getting this free money for race.  Obviously this is not true, no just gets money for being Black, White, Asian, etc. it is based on many factors.  After researching the availability of scholarships I came across one specific article that shed some light on the situation.  This article by scholastic writer Tamara Krause explains how once a day she hears the average white male complaining about how he cannot get any scholarships because he is just average, then she goes on to list several scholarships that have nearly no requirements that anyone can apply for.  This just proves yet another misconception that other races are the only ones who get special treatment or government aid for schooling.

Darlene: The article you mentioned above does clear the air on a lot of misconceptions. I also was under the impression that minority races had a greater chance of receiving scholarship money than the majority. It actually feels liberating to know that when it comes to many scholarships we are all on the same playing field, but this seems to be the only place where this is the case. Unfortunately the same can not be said about the media. The media, for what ever reason, seems to portray minorities in a negative light. In the Long Way to Go: Minorities in the Media Carlos Cort shows how the media can give minorities a negative connotation. I have also noticed how when minorities are interviewed for news stations, in many cases they have the language of an uneducated individual. These interviews are sometimes then turned into spoofs and become YouTube sensations such as, the video with Antoine Dodson, the Amanda Berry story, as well as the story told by a woman named Sweet Brown. Interviews like this promote ignorance in minorities by making it seem okay to the public for interviews to be conducted in such a manner, when in reality it demeans the race as a whole.

Jerome: That is completely true that the interviews that are put on YouTube or the news often interview the worst possible and uneducated people.  When you think about it, the problem may not lie with the people that they are interviewing being uneducated, ignorant, and minorities.  The problem could easily be the fact that the media is searching through all the candidates to find these people just to try and make a headline interesting.

 The news is constantly looking for a program or story that will give them the most ratings and have people wanting to actually look forward to the news since it is not as coveted as they were before the internet. -Huffington Post

So this allows us to draw the conclusion that perhaps its not the people who make themselves look so bad, maybe it is the media and news stations that set them up for failure.  After all, the media in recent years has been putting minorities on display as a laughing stock of the nation.  So maybe after all we need to look deeper than the actual people in the spotlight, and take a look at the people who are placing that spotlight upon the people.

Darlene: I completely agree, after reading the article mentioned above about how minorities are turned into the laughing stock of our nation. Many people may have a negative connotation about minorities based off of the ways they are presented through the media. The problem with the portrayal of minorities is that the stereotypes do not match the facts. The National Center for Education has a fast facts page that shows the percentages of races that graduate with an Associates degree, Bachelors degree, Masters, and Doctorate. African American females seem to take the lead in the United States for all degree types with Hispanics and Whites fighting for second. This in itself shows that the truth behind the stereotypes of minorities is becoming a thing of the past, and something that the media is trying to hold onto. The reasoning behind the need to continue this stereotype is beyond me, but it seems to be because there is still racism in the media, so there is still a need to bring down minorities.